Mapping Social Identity and Power in Integral Theory

I have long resisted efforts (and requests) to translate aspects of the consciousness-in-action approach into the language and frameworks of Wilber’s Integral Theory and his AQAL (all quadrants, all levels) map. But my recent conversations with Hokyo Joshua Routhier and Sarah Middendorff, from Great Lakes Integral, got me going. So, here I’m sharing a preliminary mapping of key of where and how social identity and social power may coincide in the AQAL map.   More interesting to me, though, is the diagram of how social identity development, multicultcultural organizational development, relational development and consciousness development (according to Wilber) correlate. At...

Racial Assimilation of Latinos through Race Policy

by Raúl Quiñones Rosado, Ph.D. Latinos and Race Policy in the US (Part Three) The racial assimilation of People of Color has always been a concern in efforts to end racial oppression, to mitigate its negative impacts, and to create racial equity in US society. In contrast to integration, a group’s process of gaining admission into and occupying a legitimate place within society while maintaining their own group identity, assimilation is the process by which People of Color psychologically internalize patterns of thought and behavior of white culture while largely replacing their own cultural and racial identity. In a racist...

Racializing and Re-racializing Latinos

by Raul Quiñones-Rosado, Ph.D. Latinos and Race Policy in the US (Part Two) Until very recently, Latinos have been the fastest growing segment of the US population and, at over 53 million people, they now comprise the country’s largest so-called “minority” group. What may not be commonly known, except to US Commerce Department demographers and planners in both public and private sectors, is that Latinos are an economic force with purchasing power of over $1 trillion annually. Latinos are, and have always been, a vital part of the US labor force, as well as of the US military. Of particular...

Reframing Latino Identity for the 21st Century

by Raúl Quiñones Rosado, Ph.D. Latinos and Race Policy in the US (Part One) In my social justice education and antiracism organizing work, it’s quite a task to get people, whether in education, human services, law enforcement, the judicial system, religion, philanthropy, non-profits or government, to examine how they think about race and racism or to explore the powerful personal feelings and challenging social behaviors these ideas generate. It’s harder still to get these community and institutional leaders, policy makers and enforcers to consider how racism — race prejudice plus institutional power, or as journalist Bill Moyers more poignantly declares,...

Reflections on the Latino Challenges Workshop

by Antonieta Gimeno As a Latina immigrant organizer with more than 30 years in the field, my own experience may be typical of other Latino immigrants when we arrive to the United States. Many, if not most, Latin@s don’t have much experience talking about race or how to address racism. This is not because there isn’t racism in our countries of origin. But different from Latin America and the Caribbean, here in the US, race, racism and discrimination is on the surface of many of our interactions, whether at work or in the community. And generally speaking, Latinos don’t come...

Afro-Mexicans Tell Their Story

Few people in the US, even among Black and Latino/a antiracism colleagues, are aware that more than 90% of all Africans kidnapped and enslaved by European colonizers were brought to what is now Latin America. And not only to Brazil and the Caribbean, but throughout these vast lands. Including Mexico. Así Somos: Afro Identities in the Coast is an excellent short documentary of Black or Afro-descendant Mexicans sharing perspectives of what is to be Black in Mexico. Share this:Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new...

Latino Rebels | Solidarity: Brief Accounts of Black and Latino Unity from the Late 1800s to the Present

Latino Rebels | Solidarity: Brief Accounts of Black and Latino Unity from the Late 1800s to the Present. Share this:Click to print (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Tumblr (Opens in new window)Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Like this:Like Loading...

“Giving Up” Privilege and the Nature of Change

In my antiracism and anti-oppression work I often hear people—dominant and subordinated folks alike—talk about the need for whites, men, heterosexuals, the wealthy and others similarly privileged groups to just “give up” their privilege. I just have to say, though… One cannot give up privilege, gender or racial or any other form. I cannot give up male privilege any more than I can give up being subordinated as a Latino in a racialized society. The idea of “giving up” privilege is fundamentally flawed. Privilege is not an object than one possesses; it is not a thing that is earned or...

Latino Challenges Toward Racial Equity

We’ve heard it a million times: that Latinos are the fastest growing segment of the US population (or were until just the other day) and that, together with African Americans, we are among the nation’s poorest and sickest, over-represented in prisons and unemployment lines, and under-represented in schools, business and politics. We also know that Latinos are the largest of the so-called “minority” groups in the US today and that, together with African Americans, Asian Americans, Native Americans and other People of Color, we will outnumber Whites to become the new “majority” within the next thirty years. That is, if...